Anthony Quinn's Elusive Irish Grandfather

by Claudia Casillas

April 7, 2021

Photo of Anthony Quinn, 1957
Anthony Quinn, 1957 [credit: Brooklyn&Boyle] 


Legendary actor Anthony Quinn was the son of a half-Irish/half-Mexican father and a Mexican mother. Born in Chihuahua, Mexico and raised in Los Angeles, California, Anthony never met his Irish grandfather, Frank Quinn. He wrote in his autobiography that his grandfather, a railroad engineer, died in a train accident when Anthony's father was still a boy. 1 Nevertheless, documentary evidence reveals that Frank Quinn was very much alive, remarkably close, and outlived Anthony’s father—who was also named Frank Quinn. Anthony Quinn died in 2001 at the age of eighty-six. 2

In The Time of The Mexican Revolution
Anthony Quinn’s parents fought alongside Pancho Villa in the early days of the Mexican Revolution. 3 Francisco Quinn was about twenty years old, and Manuela Pallares was about sixteen or seventeen. Women who participated in the conflict played key roles such as “spying, gun running, fighting, foraging, cooking, and providing medical aid.” They were also housed with the men in the same barracks.4 When troop leaders learned that Manuela was pregnant, they sent her back to her home to Chihuahua city, in the state of Chihuahua.5

On 2 June 1915, Manuela Pallares registered Anthony’s birth in Chihuahua. The record shows his name as Manuel Antonio Pallares and his birth date as 23 April 1915. Manuela stated that she was eighteen years old and originally from Placer de Guadalupe, which is just outside of the city of Chihuahua. The record acknowledges that the boy was her “natural” son and omits the name of his father, who was presumably still fighting in the war.6 The term “natural” was used In Mexican records when referring to a child born to unwed parents.

Anthony was baptized by the Catholic Church on 11 July 1915. His name was recorded as Manuel Antonio Queen with a birth date of 21 April 1915. The record states that he was the “legitimate son” of Francisco Queen and Manuela Pallares. His paternal grandparents were noted as Francisco Queen and Sabina Espinosa, his maternal grandmother was Maria Pallares; no maternal grandfather was named.7 Manuela and Francisco had been married by a young Catholic priest while they were in the battlefields together and this explains why she would give her son’s status as legitimate at his baptism.8 Mexican civil authorities do not recognize religious marriages as legal, this may likely be the reason why in the civil birth record the boy’s status was noted as natural.9

When Anthony Quinn was born, Chihuahua was the epicenter of the Mexican Revolution. The people there were living irregular and uncertain lives.10 Manuela and her infant son were alone without support and after taking the train to Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, on 2 August 1915 they crossed the northern border into El Paso, Texas. This is the first record in which Anthony appears as Antonio Rudolfo Quinn.11  

Almost two years later, after Francisco abandoned the revolutionary efforts, he reunited with Manuela and Anthony in Ciudad Juárez, which is just across the border from El Paso.12 In Ciudad Juárez, on 16 May 1917, the couple declared their intent to marry civilly. Table 1 shows how their information was recorded by the clerk.13

Table 1
Information Provided by Francisco Quinn and Manuela Pallares in 1917
NAME / AGE / BIRTHPLACE FATHER MOTHER
Francisco Quinn, age 23, Jiménez, Chi. Francisco Quinn, deceased Sabina Espinosa, from El Parral, Chi., widow, age 41
Manuela Pallares, age 20, Chihuahua, Chi. [not named] Maria Pallares, from Placer de Guadalupe, Chi., single, age 39

Francisco and Manuela were legally married on 6 June 1917 and the record states that the bride and groom were living at the same address in Juárez, together with their mothers.14

Single Mothers: Sabina Espinosa and Maria Pallares

No marriage record exists in Chihuahua or Texas for either Sabina Espinosa, mother of Francisco Quinn, or Maria Pallares, mother of Manuela Pallares.15 The former gave birth to Francisco Isabel Espinosa, who would later be known by the names Francisco Quinn and Frank Quinn, on 5 November 1894. She registered his birth with civil authorities in Jiménez, Chihuahua on 19 November 1894. The record indicates Francisco was her “natural” son and that Sabina was originally from El Parral, Chihuahua, eighteen years old, and single. Francisco’s maternal grandparents were Demetrio Espinosa and his wife Agapita Pérez. No paternal information was noted.16 Francisco was baptized by the Catholic Church in Jiménez, Chihuahua on 31 March 1895 as the “natural” son of Sabina Espinosa and the record likewise omits information about his father.17 Sometime between 1895 when he was baptized, and 1917 when he married, Francisco Espinosa became Francisco Quinn.

Anthony Quinn referred to his mother as Manuela Oaxaca. He wrote that she was the illegitimate daughter of Maria Pallares, a domestic worker and Jose Oaxaca, the nephew of Maria’s wealthy employer.18 No birth or baptism record exists in the state of Chihuahua for Manuela Pallares or Manuela Oaxaca, daughter of Maria Pallares.19 Manuela’s border-crossing record from August of 1915 states that she was eighteen years and three months old at the time. In 1928, Manuela filed a Declaration of Intention to become a U.S. citizen and gave her birth date as 26 April 1897.20

The Irishman
No death or burial record exists in Chihuahua for Francisco Quinn/Queen or Frank Quinn, father of Francisco Isabel (Espinosa) Queen born in 1894 and baptized in 1895.21 There was only one Frank Quinn of Irish origin employed by the railroads in Chihuahua, Mexico during this period. He was a locomotive engineer with family and associates in El Paso, Texas. A locomotive engineer was a person in charge of operating a train. They controlled the movement, speed and stops of a locomotive. They also oversaw the physical maintenance of the train’s engines.22 A trail of records shows the movements and activities of this Frank Quinn:

    • Frank Quinn, of Jiménez [Chihuahua], stayed at the The Lindell hotel in El Paso on 31 August 1899.23 His place of residence correlates with Francisco Isabel Espinosa’s place of birth.
    • Frank Quinn, a “traveling engineer of the Mexican Central” railway returned to El Paso on 28 September 1904 after visiting his brother John in St. Louis. Missouri.24
    • Frank Quinn attended the funeral of his brother John in Junction City, Kansas in 1905. John Quinn was also employed by the Mexican Central at Jiménez and died in Chihuahua. John’s widow’s parents lived in Kansas.25
    • Frank Quinn, an “old time engineer on the Mexican Central” and “confirmed old bachelor” stopped in El Paso to visit a friend before returning to Mexico on 2 November 1907.26 This item implies that Frank was not married to Francisco’s mother Sabina Espinosa.
    • Frank Quinn appeared as witness at the marriage of P.H. Shannon and Delia Quinn in El Paso on 28 December 1907. The bride and groom were from Chihuahua, Mexico.27
    • Frank Quinn who worked for the Mexican Central and a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers’ Division 575 based in Chihuahua, attended a colleague’s funeral in El Paso on 11 April 1908.28
    • Frank Quinn purchased lot numbers 17-21 of block 116 in the Highland Park neighborhood of El Paso on 17 September 1908.29
    • In 1909, “F. Quinn who, for the past 17 years has run an engine out of El Paso on the Mexican Central” railway took a hiatus to travel to his homeland of Ireland.30 On 22 June he arrived in Queenstown as Frank, an engineer, single, age 38.31 He sailed back from the port of Queenstown, arriving in New York on 9 October 1909. The arrival manifest indicates his nearest relative in Ireland was his brother James Quinn who lived in Castlerea, Roscommon, and that he was traveling home to Chihuahua, Mexico.32
    • In 1912, Frank Quinn’s mother died in Roscommon, Ireland. Seventy-two-year-old Mrs. Quinn was “survived by three daughters, Miss Kittie Quinn, Miss Margaret Quinn and Mrs. P.H. Shannon…all of El Paso, and “a son, Frank Quinn, an engineer on the National Lines of Mexico, with headquarters in Chihuahua.” This item identifies Delia Quinn as Frank’s sister.33
    • In 1913, Frank’s father died in Roscommon County, Ireland. Among eighty-year-old Mr. Quinn’s survivors was his son “Frank Quinn, connected with the National Railways at Chihuahua, Mexico.”34 No first names for mother or father were provided in the newspaper items.
The Mexican Revolution endured from November 1910 through May 1920. The railway systems were used by the rebels to transport troops and supplies.35 In Chihuahua, sections of the railroad were completely shut down after rebels destroyed some bridges and tracks.36 It appears that Frank continued to be employed in Mexico during the early years of the conflict.

In September of 1914, the Mexican government finalized a takeover of the National Railways. effectively nationalizing the services.37 Frank was probably forced to leave Mexico around this time. He appeared in the 1914 El Paso city directory, without occupation, living at 1306 Magoffin Avenue with his sisters Kittie and Margaret.38

Frank’s sister “Kittie” was Catherine Quinn, who married Peter A. Bilodeau in El Paso in 1920.39 His other sister Margaret Quinn, married Bryan Pfeifer, also in 1920 in El Paso.40 Margaret’s 1962 obituary says she was born in County Ross, Ireland to Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Quinn and that “she moved to Mexico when she was 16, and eight years later moved to this country.”41

Frank’s parents were Michael Quinn and Bridget Flynn, who were married on 12 February 1867 in the parish of Loughglynn, County Roscommon, Ireland. Their marriage record indicates they both resided at Cloonarrow, Castlerea, County Roscommon.42 Bridget’s death was registered on 29 August 1912; she died in Cloonarrow.43 Michael was a farmer; his death was registered on 19 May 1913 and he also died in Cloonarrow.44

Despite Anthony Quinn’s assertion that his grandfather Frank was from Cork in southern Ireland, that is highly unlikely, as the records show that his parents married, lived, and died in Castlerea.45 Only birth records for Frank’s brothers James, John and Michael are available in the Irish indexes online; none for Frank or his sisters.46 Frank Quinn was born between 1869 and 1872 and left Ireland for the Americas before 1885, when he appeared in the El Paso city directory as employed by the Southern Pacific freight depot.47 He was likely between the ages of sixteen and eighteen when he left Ireland. It is unclear if Frank immigrated directly to Mexico before settling in Texas, like his sister Margaret. Available Mexican records for incoming immigrants in the 1800s end in the year 1873, before Frank Quinn’s arrival. No Mexican record for any member of this Quinn family appears in the immigrant files of the early 1900s.48 Available ship manifests for departing immigrants from Ireland begin in 1890, after Frank’s arrival in the Americas. He does not appear in any arrival manifest in the United States from Ireland in the 1880s.49
The Move Out West

Facing economic uncertainty in El Paso, Anthony Quinn’s father Frank, sought work in California. After moving around the state doing odd jobs, between 1918 and 1919, he settled his family on the east side of Los Angeles. He soon found employment working in a motion pictures studio.50 When the family was enumerated in the 1920 federal census, Anthony had a little sister named Stella, and both of his grandmothers, Sabina Espinosa and Maria Pallares, were living with them at 632 Clover Street.51 On 25 February 1923, Anthony’s grandmother Maria Pallares died. The informant on her death certificate was her son-in-law Frank Quinn, living at 676 S. Daly Street.52

Frank Quinn, of 676 S. Daly Street appeared in the 1924 Los Angeles city directory. The next name in the listing was another Frank Quinn, who lived at 1153 W. 73rd Street.53 They lived about twelve miles distance from one another. This second Frank Quinn was likely his Irish father who left El Paso, Texas for Los Angeles, California.

Frank Quinn the elder emerged in Los Angeles in 1920, where he was enumerated in the federal census as an unemployed locomotive engineer, born in Ireland, of unknown age. He was a lodger at 343 S. San Pedro Street.54 That address belonged to the Hotel Santa Rosa.55

On 26 June 1924 at St. Vincent’s Catholic Church in Los Angeles, Frank J. Quinn, age fifty-two married fifty-year-old Jane A. McCarvill. The marriage certificate indicates that Frank J. lived in Ludlow, California, and was born in Ireland to Michael G. Quinn and Bridget (Flynn) Quinn. His occupation is noted as “railroad locomotive engineer.” It was Frank’s first marriage and Anne was a widow who lived in Los Angeles.56 The town of Ludlow is in San Bernardino County, about 160 miles east of Los Angeles. In the 1920s, Ludlow was the headquarters of the Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad, which transported mining supplies between Ludlow and Goldsmith, Nevada. It was also a connection point for other rail services to Los Angeles and the west coast.57

Irishman Frank Quinn’s wife, who was born in Canada, filed a Declaration of Intention for U.S. citizenship in 1937. She gave her address as 218 ½ W. 73rd Street, which is only four city blocks from the address given for the second Frank in the 1924 city directory.58 Despite the thirteen-year difference in dates of records, the proximity of addresses and other evidence support the theory that both Frank Quinns, father and son, were listed sequentially in the 1924 city directory. No Frank Quinn was listed at 1153 W. 73rd Street in 1925 or 1926 and by 1927, another family lived at that address.59

Two Tragic Endings

On 10 February 1926, Anthony Quinn’s father was killed instantly when a truck he was trying to flag down for roadside assistance struck him. The incident occurred a few feet from his home on 415 Hazard Avenue in Los Angeles.60 Frank’s death certificate indicates his father was Frank Quinn, born in Ireland. The informant was his widow, Manuela.61

On 5 August 1929, engineer Frank Quinn, died in a train accident.62 Heavy rains caused an irrigation dam to break in southern Nevada, flooding the area in his train’s path, damaging a bridge. His train derailed off the damaged bridge and plunged into the currents. Frank and another crew member drowned.63 Frank’s funeral mass was given at St. Vincent’s Catholic Church in Los Angeles on 8 August 1929. His Los Angeles obituary says that he was survived by his wife Jane A. Quinn and sisters Mrs. T.P. Cummings, Mrs. P.A. Bilodeau, and Mrs. B.B. Pfeiffer[sic].64 These surnames correlate with the marriages in El Paso for his sisters Catherine and Margaret. His sister Delia (Quinn) Shannon had a second marriage to Thomas Cummings.65

In 1948, Jane A. Quinn, of Los Angeles, California, “as widow and sole surviving heir of Frank Quinn” signed a quitclaim deed releasing her interest in the five lots that Frank purchased in El Paso, Texas in 1908.66 That same year, Anthony Quinn replaced Marlon Brando on the stage production of A Streetcar Named Desire.67

Both Frank Quinns, father and son, are buried at Calvary Cemetery in Los Angeles, California.68

Conclusion

Irishman Frank Quinn was the grandfather of Anthony Quinn, an incredibly accomplished actor, yet no public account of him exists other than the anecdotes provided by Anthony in interviews and his two autobiographies. The story—as retold many times over—was that Frank Quinn died many years before the actor’s birth. Whether the actor and his family knew that the Irishman was in their midst or not, the documentary evidence shows that he was, and that Frank Quinn the son, and Frank Quinn the father, were always on parallel paths.


  1. Anthony Quinn, The Original Sin: A Self Portrait by Anthony Quinn (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1972), 24, 72.
  2. “Passionate Star Anthony Quinn Dies,” Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA), 4 June 2001, p.1, col. 1.
  3. Quinn, Original Sin, p. 8.
  4. Elizabeth Salas, Soldaderas In the Mexican Military: Myth and History (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1990), 53-54.
  5. Quinn, Original Sin, 25-28.
  6. Chihuahua Registro Civil (Chihuahua, Mexico), “Nacimientos [Births] 1915,” vol. 52, p. 78, entry 1041, for Manuel Antonio Pallares birth, 2 June 1915; "Mexico, Chihuahua, Civil Registration, 1861-1997," browsable images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: Chihuahua > Nacimientos 1915 > image 445.
  7. Sagrario Catholic Church (Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico), "Bautismos [Baptisms] 1914-1916," vol. 20, p. 5, entry 28 for Manuel Antonio Queen baptism, 11 July 1915; "Mexico, Chihuahua, Catholic Church Records, 1632-1958," browsable images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: Chihuahua > Sagrario > Bautismos 1914-1916 > image 1553.
  8. Quinn, Original Sin, 26.
  9. “Marriage in Mexico,” MexicoLaw.com (https://mexicolaw.com : viewed 9 March 2021), item number 11.
  10. Mark Wasserman, “The Social Origins of the 1910 Revolution in Chihuahua,” Latin American Research Review, 15 (January 1980): 15.
  11. “Texas, El Paso Manifests of Arrivals at the Port of El Paso, 1905-1927,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), border crossing cards for Manuela Pallares Quinn, age 18 and Antonio Rudolfo Quinn, age 0-3mos., arriving 2 August 1915; citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication A3406. For Manuela’s personal struggle see Quinn, Original Sin, 32-34.
  12. Quinn, Original Sin, 37-41.
  13. Juárez Registro Civil (Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico), “Matrimonios [Marriages] 1908-1918,” vol. 57, p. 206, entry 108, for Francisco Quin-Manuela Payares marriage pres., 16 May 1917; "Mexico, Chihuahua, Civil Registration, 1861-1997," browsable images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: > Juárez > Matrimonios 1908-1918 > image 2320.
  14. Juárez Registro Civil (Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico), “Matrimonios [Marriages] 1908-1918,” vol. 57, p. 226, entry 194, for Francisco Quiro-Manuela Payares marriage celeb., 6 June 1917; "Mexico, Chihuahua, Civil Registration, 1861-1997," browsable images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/search : viewed 9 March 2021), path: > Juárez > Matrimonios 1908-1918 > image 2345.
  15. “Mexico, Chihuahua, Civil Registration, 1861-1997,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), searches for Sabina Espinosa marriage to Frank Quinn or Francisco Quinn/Queen and Maria Pallares marriage 1890-1900. Also, “Texas Marriages, 1837-1973,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), same search keywords.
  16. Jiménez, Registro Civil (Jiménez, Chihuahua, Mexico), “Nacimientos [Births] 1887-1896,” vol. 21, p. 39r, entry 400, for Francisco Isabel Espinosa, 19 November 1894; "Mexico, Chihuahua, Civil Registration, 1861-1997," browsable images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: > Jiménez > Nacimientos 1887-1896 > image 1026.
  17. Santo Cristo de Burgos Catholic Church (Jiménez, Chihuahua, Mexico), "Bautismos [Baptisms] 1886-1896," vol. 22, p. 71, entry 242 for Jose Francisco Espinosa baptism, 31 March 1895; "Mexico, Chihuahua, Catholic Church Records, 1632-1958," browsable images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: > Jiménez > Santo Cristo de Burgos > Bautismos 1886-1896 > image 984.
  18. Quinn, Original Sin, 19.
  19. "Mexico, Chihuahua, Civil Registration, 1861-1997," database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), searches for Manuela Pallares/Payares and Manuela Oaxaca birth registration between 1895-1900. Also "Mexico, Chihuahua, Catholic Church Records, 1632-1958," database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), searches for Manuela Pallares/Payares and Manuela Oaxaca baptism between 1895-1900.
  20. "California, U.S., Federal Naturalization Records, 1843-1999," database with images, Ancestry Library Edition (https://www.ancestrylibrary.com : viewed 9 March 2021), Declaration of Intention no. 47776, Manuela Quinn, 1 March 1928; citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication M1524, roll 026.
  21. "Mexico, Chihuahua, Civil Registration, 1861-1997," database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), searches for Francisco Quinn/Queen death registration. Also "Mexico, Chihuahua, Catholic Church Records, 1632-1958," database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), searches for Francisco Quinn/Queen burial.
  22. “Railroad Workers Move Trains Safely and Efficiently,” Rails West (http://www.railswest.com/workers.html : viewed 9 March 2021).
  23. "The Hotels," El Paso Daily Herald (El Paso, Texas), 31 August 1899, Third Edition 4:30pm, p. 8, col. 5.
  24. "News of the Railroads," El Paso Morning Times (El Paso, Texas), 28 September 1904, p. 8, col. 3.
  25. “Funeral of John Quinn,” The Junction City Union (Junction City, Kansas), 26 June 1905 Evening, p. 2, col. 3.
  26. "Another Old Timer Here from Mexico," El Paso Herald (El Paso, Texas), 2 November 1907 Evening, p. 31, col. 3.
  27. El Paso County, “Texas, County Marriage Index, 1837-1977,” vol 8, roll 4, p. 618, entry for P.H. Shannon-Delia A. Quinn marriage, 28 December 1907; index with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: 004640126 > image 767.
  28. "Kirk Funeral Today," El Paso Morning Times (El Paso, Texas), 11 April 1908, p. 3, col. 2.
  29. "Real Estate Transfers," El Paso Morning Times (El Paso, Texas), 17 September 1908, p. 5, col. 6. No deed of transfer survived or is not digitized as of date of this writing, see El Paso Texas County Clerk, “Official Public Records,” database with images, epcounty.com (https://www.epcounty.com/records.htm : viewed 9 March 2021), search for Kennary to Quinn deed, 1908.
  30. “Engineer to Visit His Old Home in Ireland,” El Paso Herald (El Paso, Texas), 8 June 1909 Evening, p. 3, col. 4.
  31. "UK and Ireland, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960," digital images, Ancestry Library Edition (www.ancestrylibrary.com : accessed 9 March 2021), manifest, R.M.S. Mauretania, New York to Liverpool, England, arriving Queenstown 22 June 1909, unpaginated [image 243 of 352], line 2, Frank Quinn, age 38, image 26 of 178; citing The National Archives of the UK; Kew, Surrey, England; Board of Trade: Commercial and Statistical Department and successors: Inwards Passenger Lists.; Class: BT26; Piece: 381.
  32. "New York, Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry Library Edition (www.ancestrylibrary.com : accessed 9 March 2021), manifest, S.S. Campania, Liverpool, England [boarded at Queenstown, Ireland, 3 Oct.] to New York, arriving 9 October 1909, p. 13v-14r (stamped), line 12, Frank Quinn, age 35, image 243 of 352; citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T715, Roll 1351. 
  33. “Mortuary Record: Mrs. Quinn,” El Paso Morning Times (El Paso, Texas), 13 September 1912, p. 2, col. 7. In 1909, the Mexican Central railway was absorbed by the National Railways of Mexico, see “Rail Transport in Mexico,” Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org : viewed 9 March 2021).
  34. "Father Dies in Ireland," El Paso Herald (El Paso, Texas), 30 May 1913, p. 4, col. 5.
  35. “The Revolution and Railroads,” The Mexican Revolution and the United States in the Collections of the Library of Congress: The War Against Huerta (www.loc.gov/exhibits/mexican-revolution-and-the-united-states/war-against-huerta.html#obj013 : viewed 9 March 2021).
  36. “General News Section,” Railway Age Gazette, 50 (March 1911): 423.
  37. “Mexico Renames National Lines,” El Paso Herald (El Paso, Texas), 15 September 1914, p. 9, col. 4.
  38. Worley's Directory of El Paso, Texas, 1914 (Dallas: John F. Worley Directory Company, 1914), 504.
  39. El Paso County, “Texas, County Marriage Index, 1837-1977,” vol 22, roll 11, p. 61, entry for Bilodea?-Catherine MJ Quinn marriage, 18 September 1920; index with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: 004640131 > image 415.
  40. El Paso County, “Texas, County Marriage Index, 1837-1977,” vol 22, roll 11, p. 61, entry for Bryan Pfeifer-Margaret Quinn marriage, 20 September 1920; index with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: 004640131 > image 416.
  41. "East Moline Deaths: Mrs. Margaret Pfeifer," The Rock Island Argus (Rock Island, Illinois), 9 August 1962, p. 3. County Ross is another name for County Roscommon.
  42. Loughglynn Catholic Church (Loughglynn, Roscommon County, Ireland), "Liber Matrimoniorum [Marriages] 11 Jan. 1865 to Jan. 1881,” unpaginated arranged by entry number, entry 77 for Michael Quinn-Brigida Flynn marriage, 12 February 1867; "Diocese of Elphin, County of Roscommon, Marriages," browsable images, Catholic Parish Registers at National Library of Ireland (https://registers.nli.ie : viewed 9 March 2021), microfilm 04619/03, image 9.
  43. District of Frenchpark Registrar (Castlerea, Roscommon County, Ireland), “Deaths 1912 - Group Registration ID 5263920,” p. 86, certified copy sheet 4492581, entry 163, for Bridget Quinn death, 25 August 1912; "Indexes of the Civil Registers (GRO) of Births, Marriages, Civil Partnerships and Deaths" database with images www.IrishGenealogy.ie (https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie : viewed 9 March 2021).
  44. District of Frenchpark Registrar (Castlerea, Roscommon County, Ireland), “Deaths 1913 - Group Registration ID 5313172,” p. 81, certified copy sheet 4484308, entry 230, for Michael Quinn death, 19 May 1913; "Indexes of the Civil Registers (GRO) of Births, Marriages, Civil Partnerships and Deaths" database with images www.IrishGenealogy.ie (https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie : viewed 9 March 2021).
  45. Quinn, Original Sin, 289.
  46. "Indexes of the Civil Registers (GRO) of Births, Marriages, Civil Partnerships and Deaths" database with images www.IrishGenealogy.ie (https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie : viewed 9 March 2021), searches for Frank Quinn and Francis Quinn born between 1867-1872.
  47. El Paso, Texas and Paso del Norte, Mexico Business Directory for 1885 (Albuquerque: Rackliff & Wainey, 1885), 65.
  48. Mexico, Secretaría de Gobernación Siglo XX, "Departamento de Migración," No. 201; database, Archivo General de la Nacion Guia General (https://archivos.gob.mx/guiageneral/ : viewed 9 March 2021), searches for Delia, John, Frank, Margaret, and Catherine/Kittie Quinn.
  49. “All Immigration & Emigration,” collection, database with images, Ancestry Library Edition (https://www.ancestrylibrary.com : viewed 9 March 2021.), searches for Frank Quinn, Francis Quinn, departing Ireland arriving United States between 1880-1885.
  50. Quinn, Original Sin, p. 49-58, 86-87.
  51. 1920 U.S. census, Los Angeles County, CA, population schedule, Los Angeles, enumeration district (ED) 242, sheet 43B, house no. 632, lines 90-96, Francesco Quine household; National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T625, roll 109.
  52. Los Angeles County, death certificate no. 1808 (1923), for Marie Pallares, “California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-1994” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: Los Angeles, Los Angeles > Death certificates 1923 no 670-2920 > image 1257.
  53. Los Angeles City Directory 1924 (Los Angeles: Los Angeles Directory Co., 1924), p. 1851.
  54. 1920 U.S. census, Los Angeles County, CA, population schedule, Los Angeles, enumeration district (ED) 235, sheet 27A, house no. 343, line 19, Frank Quinn, National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication T625, roll 109.
  55. Los Angeles City Directory 1920 (Los Angeles: Los Angeles Directory Co., 1920), p. 2473.
  56. Los Angeles County, marriage certificate no. 8294 for Frank J. Quinn-Jane A. McCarvill, 28 June 1924, “California, County Marriages, 1850-1952,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: 005698420 > image 1901.
  57. “Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad,” Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org : viewed 9 March 2021).
  58. "California, U.S., Federal Naturalization Records, 1843-1999," database with images, Ancestry Library Edition (https://www.ancestrylibrary.com : viewed 9 March 2021), Declaration of Intention no. 82652, Jane Ann Quinn, 21 September 1937; citing National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) microfilm publication M1524, roll 048.
  59. Kelt’s Geographical Directory, Los Angeles, September 1927, Vol. 2 (Oakland, CA: Kelt’s Geographical Directory Co., 1927), p. K6. See also, Los Angeles City Directory 1925, and 1926 (Los Angeles: Los Angeles Directory Co., 1925, 1926), searches under “Q” for Quinn.
  60. "Man Killed by Lightless Truck," Los Angeles Record (Los Angeles, California), 11 January 1926, p. 1, col. 7.
  61. Los Angeles County, death certificate no. 362 (1926), for Frank Quinn, “California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-1994” database with images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : viewed 9 March 2021), path: Los Angeles > Los Angeles > Death certificates 1926 no 1-699 > image 391.
  62. California Department of Health and Welfare, state file no. 44313 (1929) for Frank J. Quinn, 5 August 1929, “California, U.S., Death Index, 1905-1939,” index, Ancestry Library Edition (https://www.ancestrylibrary.com : viewed on 9 March 2021).
  63. "Nevada Floods Take Life Toll," Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California), 7 August 1929, p. 5, col. 5.
  64. "Deaths: Quinn," Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, California), 7 August 1929, p. 18, col. 4.
  65. “Mrs. Delia Quinn Cummings Obituary,” El Paso Times (El Paso, Texas), 9 December 1958, p. 9, col. 3.
  66. El Paso County, Texas, Deed Book 909:116-117, Quinn to Johnson quitclaim, 31 August 1949 [indexed as 1 January 1948]; “Official Public Records,” epcounty.com (https://www.epcounty.com/records.htm : viewed 9 March 2021).
  67. Roger Boxill, Modern Dramatists: Tennessee Williams (New York City: St. Martin’s Press Inc., 1987), 76.
  68. California death certificate no. 362 (1926), for Frank Quinn. Also, "Deaths: Quinn," Los Angeles Times, 7 August 1929.


Copyright © 2021 by Claudia Casillas